Building on the Early American theme, William Schultz chose clipper ships as a symbol for his Old Spice for Men product line.  Most of the historic ships that appeared over the years sailed from the home port of Salem, Massachusetts, a prosperous seaport in Colonial America.  Below are most of the ships used in Old Spice packaging.
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12 Meter Racing Sloop

 An example of a 12 meter racing sloop as raced in the America's Cup.  This appeared on an etched glass stein in 1988.


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Ariel

The Ariel was a famous clipper ship of the 1860s.  It is the fourth of four ships portrayed on the Nautical Stein Series (1990). 

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Columbia


The Columbia won the America's Cup in 1899 and in 1901.  It is the third of four ships portrayed on the Nautical Stein Series (1989). 

 

Birmingham

This clipper appeared in the early 1970s in a more formal "oil painting motif" on the cover of select gift sets.  (See Hamilton for an example of this style)

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Essex

To my knowledge the Frigate Essex only appeared for a short time in the 1940s and 1950s on select gift set boxes.

Brig. Experiment

Used on original and subsequent packaging through the mid 1950s.
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Flying Cloud

The Clipper Ship Flying Cloud appeared on a  flask decanter in 1985.   The Flying Cloud, launched April 15, 1851, was the supreme ship built during the Clipper era.  On her maiden voyage she sailed from New York to San Francisco in 80 days around Cape Horn, a record never beaten by another ship.

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old spice ships

Friendship

Used on original and subsequent packaging, and on mugs starting around 1940. The Friendship made 17 voyages to European and Asiatic ports, and was captured by the British in 1812.

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Grand Turk

Original ship logo on all mugs, bottles and packaging,  Used continuously until the early 1990s.  It also appears in the first of the Nautical Stein series in 1986 (bottom left). 

Hamilton

This clipper appeared in the early 1970s in a more formal "oil painting motif" on the cover of select gift sets.
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old spice ships

Ship Magic

The Magic, originally known as Madgic, appeared on a commemorative flask in 1989.  She was a 92 ton centerboard schooner.  Built in 1867, she measured 84 feet in length and was initially rigged as a sloop.  Two years later she was rigged as a schooner and won her first race in June 1865 in a New York Yacht Club regatta.  In August 1870, after being completely rebuilt at City Island, the Magic won the first defense of the America's Cup in 4 hours, 7 minutes, 54 seconds, a record time for the 85 mile course.

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Mt. Vernon

Used on original and subsequent packaging, and became identified with Talcum around 1945. In 1952, it appeared on a travel talc bottle as the only Old Spice ship to be sailing to the right!  The Mt. Vernon outwitted and outmaneuvered a French cruiser in a thrilling running fight during its history.

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Maria Theresa

This clipper appeared in the early 1970s in a more formal "oil painting motif" on the cover of select gift sets. 

Propontis

Used on packaging for a gift set of after shave and cologne in the early 1970s
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Recovery

Used on original and subsequent packaging through the 1950s. During the 1940s, the Ship Recovery first appeared on the cologne bottle, and appeared on shaving mugs from the 1960s until the end of the mugs in 1992. Its distinguishing feature is the curled pennant.  The Recovery was the first American vessel to visit Mocha, Arabia, and start the flourishing coffee trade.

Salem

This clipper appeared in the early 1970s in a more formal "oil painting motif" on the cover of select gift sets.  (See Hamilton for an example of this style)

Sooloo

old spice The Ship Sooloo was built in 1840 in Salem, Mass., and ran aground in 1879.

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Wesley

This clipper appeared in the early 1970s in a more formal "oil painting motif" on the cover of select gift sets.